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2017

Summer 2017(#127) pdf
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Spring 2017 (#126) pdf
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2016

Winter 2016 (#125) pdf
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2015

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2014

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2013

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2012

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2003

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2002

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2001

Winter 2001 - 02 (#65)
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2000

Winter 2000 - 01 (#61)
Fall 2000 (#60)
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1999

Winter 1999 - 00 (#57)
Fall 1999 (#56)
Summer 1999 (#55)
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Image says Accessability - graphic in grey for Access and green for Ability with dove in grey on newpaper that says Extra! Extra! Read all about it.

 

Trumped-Up Health Care Reform

by Maria Dibble

We have all heard a tremendous amount of discussion about the Affordable Care Act (ACA), which some refer to as ObamaCare. Much of what we’ve heard is what President Trump’s Counselor Kellyanne Conway referred to as “alternate facts”, and latched onto by the media. I’m going to try to offer some real facts, not popular nowadays I know, but my preferred style of communication.

First, I need to clear up one thing. Many people with ACA insurance hear stories about all the problems with Obama-Care, and want to get rid of it, while at the same time enjoying the lower cost coverage they’ve obtained through the ACA. The Affordable Care Act and ObamaCare are one and the same. If you or someone you know is getting health coverage through the New York State of Health, more commonly called the “Marketplace”, that’s ObamaCare.

To lay the groundwork for this editorial, I refer to a recent report released by the NY State Department of Health (DOH), which provides some startling and important statistics...

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American Psycho

Here’s the latest in the ongoing psychodrama that is the Republican push to repeal ObamaCare and radically change Medicaid.

Actually, no, we’re not going to recount the stomach-churning lurches and stumbles of the political process that has taken place the last several months. Suffice it to say that for politicians, it is one thing to spout off for one’s limited fan base when one knows that no legislation is going to pass, and quite another to get something done in front of all of the voters in your district.

Instead, we’ll try to shed light on some of the issues that have been discussed during this process...

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NY Connects Comes to STIC

STIC is pleased to announce a new program, in conjunction with the local Offices for Aging in Broome, Chenango and Tioga Counties. Funded through the NY State Office for Aging (NYSOFA), STIC is a subcontractor of the Resource Center for Independent Living (RCIL) in Utica, partnering with NY Connects in each of the above three counties. The goal is to expand the resources of NY Connects to serve more people with disabilities as well as older individuals.

What is NY Connects? It is an expanded information, referral and assistance service that includes the following: Referrals to all agencies, including for-profit businesses and programs; screening for financial services; person-centered “options counseling”, which presents the options available in response to the consumer’s question, as well as assistance in understanding the choices so they can make an informed decision; public benefits and application assistance; direct coordination between agencies for services; and more...

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Summer 2017 Issue No. 127 - web site version

Summer 2017 Issue No. 127 - pdf version