Newsletter Issues

2018

Winter 2018-19 (#133) pdf Winter 2018-19 (#133) web Fall 2018 (#132) pdf
Fall 2018 (#132) web
Summer 2018 (#131) pdf
Summer 2018 (#131) web
Spring 2018 (#130) pdf
Spring 2018 (#130) web

2017

Winter 2017-18 (#129) pdf
Winter 2017-18 (#129) web
Fall 2017 (#128) pdf
Fall 2017 (#128) web
Summer 2017(#127) pdf
Summer 2017 (#127) web
Spring 2017 (#126) pdf
Spring 2017 (#126) web

2016

Winter 2016 (#125) pdf
Winter 2016 (#125) web
Fall 2016 (#124) pdf
Fall 2016 (#124) web
Summer 2016 (#123) pdf
Summer 2016 (#123) web
Spring 2016 (#122) pdf
Spring 2016 (#122) web

2015

Winter 2015 (#121) pdf
Winter 2015 (#121) web
Fall 2015 (#120) pdf
Fall 2015 (#120) web
Summer 2015 (#119) pdf
Summer 2015 (#119) web
Spring 2015 (#118) pdf
Spring 2015 (#118) web

2014

Winter 2014 (#117) pdf
Winter 2014 (#117) web
Fall 2014 (#116) pdf
Fall 2014 (#116) web
Summer 2014 (#115) pdf
Summer 2014 (#115) web
Spring 2014 (#114) pdf
Spring 2014 (#114) web

2013

Winter 2013-14 (#113) pdf
Winter 2013-14 (#113) web
Fall 2013 (#112) pdf
Fall 2013 (#112) web
Summer 2013 (#111) pdf
Summer 2013 (#111) web
Spring 2013 (#110) pdf
Spring 2013 (#110) web

2012

Winter 2012 - 13 (#109) pdf
Winter 2012 -13 (#109) web
Fall 2012 (#108) pdf
Fall 2012 (#108) web
Summer 2012 (#107)
Spring 2012 (#106)

2011

Winter 2011 - 12 (#105)
Fall 2011 (#104)
Summer 2011 (#103)
Spring 2011 (#102)

2010

Winter 2010 - 11 (#101)
Fall 2010 (#100)
Summer 2010 (#99)
Spring 2010 (#98)

2009

Winter 2009 - 10 (#97)
Fall 2009 (#96)
Summer 2009 (#95)
Spring 2009 (#94)

2008

Winter 2008 - 09 (#93)
Fall 2008 (#92)
Summer 2008 (#91)
Spring 2008 (#90)

2007

Winter 2007 - 08 (#89)
Fall 2007 (#88)
Summer 2007 (#87)
Spring 2007 (#86)

2006

Winter 2006 - 07 (#85)
Fall 2006 (#84)
Summer 2006 (#83)
Spring 2006 (#82)

2005

Winter 2005 - 06 (#81)
Fall 2005 (#80)
Summer 2005 (#79)
Spring 2005 (#78)

2004

Winter 2004 - 05 (#77)
Fall 2004 (#76)
Summer 2004 (#75)
Spring 2004 (#74)

2003

Winter 2003 - 04 (#73)
Fall 2003 (#72)
Summer 2003 (#71)
Spring 2003 (#70)

2002

Winter 2002-03 (#69)
Fall 2002 (#68)
Summer 2002 (#67)
Spring 2002 (#66)

2001

Winter 2001 - 02 (#65)
Fall 2001 (#64)
Summer 2001 (#63)
Spring 2001 (#62)

2000

Winter 2000 - 01 (#61)
Fall 2000 (#60)
Summer 2000 (#59)
Spring 2000 (#58)

1999

Winter 1999 - 00 (#57)
Fall 1999 (#56)
Summer 1999 (#55)
Spring 1999 (#54)

 

Image says Accessability - graphic in grey for Access and green for Ability with dove in grey on newpaper that says Extra! Extra! Read all about it.

 

How Your Votes Counted

by Maria Dibble

By now, you are probably as tired of hearing about the mid-term elections as I am, but they could have major impact on the lives of people with disabilities.

First, state government. The Senate now has a super-majority of Democrats, and will set the agenda for the year. The Assembly remains strongly in Democratic hands, though they did lose a few seats. And, of course, Governor Cuomo easily won re-election as well.

So, in 2019, all branches of NY state government will firmly be held by Democrats. What does this mean?

Continue reading...

 

Pass the Child Victims Act

by Pat Green Gumson

While I am not a stranger to the disability community, an introduction may be helpful. I began my work as a Head Injury Advocate at the Southern Tier Independence Center (STIC) in Binghamton in 1986. I worked with people with brain injuries and their families. I greatly admired and respected the mothers of young people with traumatic brain injury (TBI) who, like the mothers in Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD), used their anger to help others as advocates for prevention and services.

At that time, I did not know that one of my five children was being viciously and sexually abused by a pedophile priest, starting at age eight, and that he, as is typical, would not come forward for another 35 years. So, now I am one of those angry advocate mothers.

Continue reading...

 

Don't Shoot Me, I'm Disabled

“I have been asked questions like ‘You mean they are not all the same?’ or ‘So they are not out to hurt us?’”

That’s Patti Saylor, who trains police officers in how to deal with people with disabilities.

You may remember the name Saylor. Ethan Saylor was a young man with Down syndrome who was killed by police because he wanted to stay in his seat in a movie theater and watch a film a second time. Patti is his mother. We told his story in AccessAbility back in the summer of 2016. Unfortunately, little has changed since then.

Continue reading...

 

 

Winter 2018-19 Issue No. 133 - web site version

Winter 2018-19 Issue No. 133 - pdf version